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Rick's Fiesta Continues

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 This week on Fiesta at Rick's , Rick Bayless' NEW series on Martha Stewart Living Radio, Rick was joined by culinary masters Marcus Samuelsson and Peter Hoffman.  The conversations were full of energy and important tips on sustainability, eating well, and of course, throwing a fiesta!

Don't forget to tune in every Wednesday at 7pm eastern now through August 11 on Martha Stewart Living Radio, Sirius 112 and XM 157.

Rick tells us where in the house the party should get started.

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Marcus and Rick take us behind the scenes at Top Chef Masters

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Marcus talks about his best party memories in Sweden

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Peter talks about the changing relationship between chefs and farmers

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Chef Marcus Samuelsson is animated and excited about the food he cooks.

1 Chef Marcus Samuelsson is animated and excited about the food he cooks.

Rick had a great time throughout the show.

2 Rick had a great time throughout the show.

Chef Peter Hoffman enjoyed his chat with Rick.

3 Chef Peter Hoffman enjoyed his chat with Rick.

Marcus Samuelsson and Rick Bayless.

4 Marcus Samuelsson and Rick Bayless.

Rick Bayless and Peter Hoffman.

5 Rick Bayless and Peter Hoffman.

And check out some of Rick's new recipes today!

“Brava” Steak

 

Carne Asada Brava

My directions may sound a little cranky, calling as they do for a charcoal fire with no gas grill alternative.  It’s just that I’m trying to make a point.  Of course you can use a gas grill to cook the meat … but those special ingredients you’re lavishing on your guests just won’t be able to work all their magic.  Unless you use charcoal, or wood, or at least throw some pieces of hardwood on your gas grill to conjure those special aromatics. The thrillingly spicy roasted garlic-green chile marinade sears more genuinely into the ribeye steaks over a smoky fire.  And Salsa Huevona, should that be your choice to spoon alongside the steak, is decidedly better when the ingredients are blistered and blackened over glowing coals.  This is one of the most delicious spicy steak dishes I know.   

Working Head: The marinade can be made a day or two ahead. Don’t marinate the steaks for more than hour or so, or the meat can lose its color and surface texture.  And don’t grill the steaks until you’re nearly ready to eat.  They will hold (in fact, they have better texture when held) for up to 30 minutes in a very low oven on a rack set over a rimmed baking sheet to catch juices.

                                                                                    Serves 6

6 large garlic cloves, unpeeled

4 fresh serrano or 2 fresh jalapeño chiles, stemmed

1/4 cup fresh lime juice

2 tablespoons vegetable or olive oil, plus more for the steaks

Salt

6 ribeye steaks about 1 inch thick (they’ll weigh about 10 to 12 ounces each)

  1. Marinate the steaks.  In a small ungreased skillet, roast the unpeeled garlic and the chiles over medium heat, turning occasionally, until both are soft  and blotchy black in places—5 to 10 minutes for the chiles, 10 to 15 minutes for the garlic.  Cool, then peel the garlic.  Place both garlic and chiles in a food processor along with the lime juice and oil.  Run the machine until the mixture is as smoothly pureed as possible. Season highly with salt, usually about 1 ½ teaspoons.  Smear the mixture over both sides of the steaks, cover and refrigerate for 1 hour.
  2. Grill the steaks.  Light a charcoal fire and let the coals burn until they are covered with gray ash; position the grill grate and let it heat for a couple of minutes. Spray or brush the steaks on both sides with a little oil.  Lay on the grill grates and let cook for 3 or 4 minutes, until the grates have nicely seared beautiful grill marks into the meat—don’t attempt to move the steaks until you can see nice marking.  Flip the steaks and cook until as done as you like (typically about 2 to 3 minutes longer for medium rare).  I like to let the steaks rest for a few minutes (on a cool part of the grill, on a grate suspended over the back of the grill or on a rack over a baking sheet in a very low oven) before serving to allow the meat to reabsorb all the juices.  Serve with Lazy Salsa or another salsa or hot sauce of your liking.

 

“Lazy” Salsa

 

Salsa Huevona

Ok, I know the name’s a little edgy, since many people wouldn’t use huevona around their grandmother.  Perhaps I should have translated salsa huevona as ‘lazy-ass salsa,’ more clearly capturing to the sentiment one of our cooks was expressing when he christened this salsa.  That was after his cousin put tomatoes, onions and jalapeños on the backyard grill one Sunday afternoon and promptly forgot them until they were nearly throw-away blackened.  And then he decided to use them anyway, which actually was to his credit, because something, well, alchemical seemed to happen.  Alchemical and quite delicious.  Though rustic and a little huevona.   

Working Ahead:  This salsa keeps well for 3 or 4 days in the refrigerator, covered.

Makes 2 ½ cups, serving 6 generously

1 ½ pounds (4 medium-small round) ripe tomatoes

1 medium white onion, cut in half

3 or 4 fresh jalapeños, stemmed

4 unpeeled garlic cloves

Salt

  1. Char the ingredients.   Light a charcoal fire and let the coals burn until they are covered with gray ash; position the grill grate and let it heat for a couple of minutes.  Lay on the tomatoes, onion halves, jalapeños and garlic. (To keep the garlic from dropping through and to make cleanup easy, I typically lay one of those perforated grill pans on the grill grates, heat it up, then lay on the vegetables.)  Grill the ingredients, turning occasionally, until they are kind of charred, but not incinerated—about 10 minutes for the garlic, 15 minutes for the chiles and 20 minutes for the tomatoes and onions.  As they are done remove the ingredients to a rimmed baking sheet.  Let cool. Peel the garlic.  If you wish, you can pull the charred skins off the tomatoes.
  2. Finish the salsa.  In a food processor, combine the garlic and chiles.  Pulse until coarsely pureed.  Add the tomatoes and any juices that have collected on the baking sheet, and pulse until roughly chopped.  Chop the charred onion and place in a bowl.  Stir in the tomato mixture, along with a little water (usually about 2 tablespoons), to give the salsa an easily spoonable consistency.  Taste and season with salt, usually about 1 teaspoon.

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