Martha Stewart Living Radio: The Radio Blog

How to Make All-Natural Easter Egg Dye

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These Easter Eggs were dyed using just salt, vinegar, and plants!

1 These Easter Eggs were dyed using just salt, vinegar, and plants!

You'll need table salt, white vinegar, beets, turmeric, red cabbage, and coffee to make these four natural dyes.

2 You'll need table salt, white vinegar, beets, turmeric, red cabbage, and coffee to make these four natural dyes.

I measured out salt and vinegar for each jar first, using the amounts in the marthastewart.com directions.

3 I measured out salt and vinegar for each jar first, using the amounts in the marthastewart.com directions.

To create dye, I chopped up half a head of cabbage and boiled it in three cups of water for 30 minutes. I did the same with the beet dye, and for coffee I just brewed a very strong pot. The dyes cooled on my counter overnight.

4 To create dye, I chopped up half a head of cabbage and boiled it in three cups of water for 30 minutes. I did the same with the beet dye, and for coffee I just brewed a very strong pot. The dyes cooled on my counter overnight.

Chris placed hard boiled eggs into every jar.

5 Chris placed hard boiled eggs into every jar.

The cabbage dye is red, but it makes eggs turn blue.  The cold dip method makes pastel eggs - if we'd boiled them in dye they'd be more brilliantly colored.

6 The cabbage dye is red, but it makes eggs turn blue. The cold dip method makes pastel eggs - if we'd boiled them in dye they'd be more brilliantly colored.

The tumeric dye is simply four tablespoons of tumeric added to the water, salt, and vinegar base.

7 The tumeric dye is simply four tablespoons of tumeric added to the water, salt, and vinegar base.

Coffee makes a dinosaur egg!

8 Coffee makes a dinosaur egg!

The beet dyed eggs were pink and speckled.

9 The beet dyed eggs were pink and speckled.

Red cabbage made the eggs a pretty purplish blue.

10 Red cabbage made the eggs a pretty purplish blue.

Tumeric needs time to develop color, as this pale yellow egg proves.  We only had 25 minutes in studio, but you could soak an hour at home.

11 Tumeric needs time to develop color, as this pale yellow egg proves. We only had 25 minutes in studio, but you could soak an hour at home.

Our crafty dudes Steve and Chris had fun coloring - and then eating - the eggs.

12 Our crafty dudes Steve and Chris had fun coloring - and then eating - the eggs.

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On today's holiday installment of Whole Living's Crafting with Dudes series, we dyed Easter eggs using all-natural dyes made from coffee, beets, tumeric, and red cabbage. It's simple, they come out beautifully and, as a bonus, you have beets and cabbage to toss into a salad later! Sure, your house will smell like cabbage for a bit, but that's a small price to pay for this fun craft.

The detailed instructions are here and here, and check out the photos above to see how we colored our eggs in studio today with Crafternoon author Maura Madden and our own Steve Gonzalez and Chris Hauselt.

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