Martha Stewart Living Radio: The Radio Blog

Charcuterie on "Cooking Today"

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Charcuterie for breakfast?  “Cooking Today” co-hosts Bruce Weinstein and Mark Scarbrough say yes! 

Yesterday the award-winning food writing team not only raved about their latest favorite breakfast food – The Meat Market’s trotter porchetta, they invited owner and butcher Jeremy Stanton on the show to talk about his methods, and share a taste of his mouth-watering charcuterie.

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1 of 7
Co-host, Bruce Weinstein sharing his tips for using ramps.

1 Co-host, Bruce Weinstein sharing his tips for using ramps.

The Meat Market's Jeremy Stanton explaining how to get rid of hog's hair, before making head cheese.

2 The Meat Market's Jeremy Stanton explaining how to get rid of hog's hair, before making head cheese.

Co-host, Mark Scarbrough talking about charcuterie for breakfast.

3 Co-host, Mark Scarbrough talking about charcuterie for breakfast.

Head Cheese

4 Head Cheese

Trotter Porchetta

5 Trotter Porchetta

Prosciutto

6 Prosciutto

The Meat Market's Jeremy Stanton with Bruce Weinstein and Mark Scarbrough.

7 The Meat Market's Jeremy Stanton with Bruce Weinstein and Mark Scarbrough.

Bruce and Mark also offered up a ramp-cured halibut dish and spoke about why it’s a save version for making your own “charcuterie” at home. 

Check out Bruce and Mark’s recipe below and be sure to tune in tomorrow when Southern food writer, Nathalie Dupree joins the duo to talk biscuits, recipes and more!

“Cooking Today,” is live each Monday, Wednesday, and Friday at 3 p.m. ET / 12 p.m. PT, on Sirius XM 110.

Bruce Weinstein and Mark Scarbrough’s Ramp-Cured Halibut Gravlax
Makes about 6 servings

Ingredients:
1/3 cup chopped ramps, green parts only
1/3 cup coarse sea salt
1/3 cup sugar
1/4 cup olive oil
1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
Two 1-pound halibut fillets, skinned
3 tablespoons minced dill fronds

Directions:
1. Place the ramps, sea salt, sugar, olive oil, and pepper in a food processor fitted with the chopping blade; process until a grainy paste.

2. Massage a quarter of this mixture into one side of each fillet. Place them coated side down in a 9 x 13-inch glass baking dish or other nonreactive dish. Massage the remaining paste into the fillets, coating them thoroughly. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate for 24 hours.

3.  Rinse well, pat dry, and slice off any dried edges. Coat the fish with the dill and slice into paper-thin strips. Store unsliced portions wrapped in the refrigerator up to 4 days.

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