Martha Stewart Living Radio: The Radio Blog

Entries from the ‘Word of the Day’ Category

Word of the Day: sabotage

Posted by

Sabotage means to throw someone else’s plan off course. Think of a sabotage as an obstruction. But sabotage is actually French for walking loudly. Remember the sabot? This [&hellip…

Word of the Day: discrete

Posted by

Use discrete when you’re talking about things that are separate and distinct. Your car, for example, comprises many discrete parts. This is related to discern, meaning to distinguish [&hellip…

Word of the Day: tomato

Posted by

Tomatoes are grown around the world, but they’re native to South America. In their native habitat, several hundred years ago, tomatoes were anything but sought after. They were [&hellip…

Word of the Day: picayune

Posted by

Something picayune is petty, frivolous, or trivial. Something picayunish is small in size or stature. Picayune is not English but American French, popularized among Cajun speakers after arriving [&hellip…

Word of the Day: curriculum

Posted by

A curriculum is a series of classes that make up a course of study. But originally a curriculum involved a course in the track-and-field sense. In Latin, a [&hellip…

Word of the Day: student

Posted by

A student is identified by her quest for knowledge. The only entrance requirement to be a student is that you study. And studying implies that you’re really devoting [&hellip…

Word of the Day: passed

Posted by

If you scored well on a test, you’ve passed it. In this case, we’re talking about the verb pass. That –ed ending means the verb is in the [&hellip…

Word of the Day: class

Posted by

Today’s class begins in the early days of Rome, known as the Regal Period. The Servian Constitution divided Rome’s citizens into six divisions based on wealth. Each division [&hellip…